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MySQL | TIMESTAMP method

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Date and Time
schedule Jul 1, 2022
Last updated
local_offer MySQL
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tocTable of Contents
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MySQL's TIMESTAMP(~) method returns the input as a datetime value when used with a single argument, and returns the sum of the arguments when used with two arguments.

Syntax

SELECT TIMESTAMP(expr);
SELECT TIMESTAMP(expr1, expr2);

Parameters

1. expr | date/datetime

The date/datetime to return the datetime for.

2. expr1 | date/datetime

A date/datetime to add the time provided in expr2 to.

3. expr2 | time

A time value to add to the date/datetime provided in expr1.

WARNING

We either provide one argument expr or two arguments expr1 and expr2 as inputs to this method.

Return value

Case

Return value

Single argument provided

Datetime value

Two arguments provided

Sum of two arguments

Examples

Consider the following table about some students:

student_id

fname

lname

day_enrolled

age

username

1

Sky

Towner

2015-12-03

17

stowner1

2

Ben

Davis

2016-04-20

19

bdavis2

3

Travis

Apple

2018-08-14

18

tapple3

4

Arthur

David

2016-04-01

16

adavid4

5

Benjamin

Town

2014-01-01

17

btown5

The above sample table can be created using the code here.

Basic usage

To return student enrollment dates as a datetime:

SELECT fname, day_enrolled, TIMESTAMP(day_enrolled)
FROM students;
+----------+--------------+-------------------------+
| fname | day_enrolled | TIMESTAMP(day_enrolled) |
+----------+--------------+-------------------------+
| Sky | 2015-12-03 | 2015-12-03 00:00:00 |
| Ben | 2016-04-20 | 2016-04-20 00:00:00 |
| Travis | 2018-08-14 | 2018-08-14 00:00:00 |
| Arthur | 2016-04-01 | 2016-04-01 00:00:00 |
| Benjamin | 2014-01-01 | 2014-01-01 00:00:00 |
+----------+--------------+-------------------------+

Note that dates are assumed to have time value of 00:00:00 when converting to datetime.

To return the sum of two arguments:

SELECT TIMESTAMP('2019-10-23 07:00:00', '13:00:00');
+----------------------------------------------+
| TIMESTAMP('2019-10-23 07:00:00', '13:00:00') |
+----------------------------------------------+
| 2019-10-23 20:00:00 |
+----------------------------------------------+

To perform summation with negative time:

SELECT TIMESTAMP('2019-10-23 07:00:00', '-13:00:00');
+-----------------------------------------------+
| TIMESTAMP('2019-10-23 07:00:00', '-13:00:00') |
+-----------------------------------------------+
| 2019-10-22 18:00:00 |
+-----------------------------------------------+

In this case we are subtracting 13 hours from the input datetime '2019-10-23 07:00:00'.

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Published by Arthur Yanagisawa
Edited by 0 others
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